'The purpose of training is to achieve a change in the behaviour of those trained and to enable them to perform better.' Discuss.

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Overall, I think that the statement has many positive attributes.  No one would deny that training and management, in general, is designed to help individuals become better at a given task or job.  Yet, I think that some of the assumptions made in the quote are problematic.  The most elemental is that it presumes that there is one way to function and training is to bring this one way out.  It seems to me that the 21st Century workplace is one where multiple approaches are needed to embrace solutions to wide and pervasive problems.  I don't think that there is one way to present solutions to such challenges.  Given the multi- dimensional aspect of technology that is available to all, I think that allowing a zone of development which enables individuals to approach problem solving in the widest of manners is desirable.  At the same time, I am uncomfortable with the word "behavior."  Management or training might pose what it feels is best, but this does not nor should automatically trade off with the "behavior" of its employees. Different management techniques, such as the paradigm offered in the Total Quality Management vision, do not view employees in this manner, but rather see their contributions as part of the larger whole.   I think that the statement has overall good intentions, but must be qualified a bit in the modern setting.

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