What is an existing inequity intervention in Canada intended to improve health inequities? What is the organization/organizations involved and/or social policies enacted in the implementation of...

What is an existing inequity intervention in Canada intended to improve health inequities?

  • What is the organization/organizations involved and/or social policies enacted in the implementation of the intervention?
  • Is/was the intervention successful and what lessons can public health practitioners learn from the experience that might improve population health in the United States?

Asked on by bukky1

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Tamara K. H. | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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It's well proven that poverty and social inequality also produce health inequities among the populations of a society. Canada's National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy (NCCHHPP) conducted a great deal of research to show that the gap in health inequity cannot be reduced until the level of "educational failure" and the numbers of unemployment are reduced, as well as "housing standards" raised ("Thirteen Public Interventions In Canada"). The NCCHHPP has particularly found that the most successful health inequity interventions are the ones aimed to "reduce poverty itself" by "raising levels of educational attainment, by working to reduce unemployment, and by raising the income of those at the bottom of the social hierarchy" ("Thirteen"). While the NCCHHPP reports on much older health inequity initiatives, below is more current research and a more current initiative.

Since 2009, Canada's Institute of Population and Public Health (IPPH) has been running an extensive research program to find out what health inequity interventions are needed and what interventions are successful. Many different research programs are being funded through this one strategic plan, including one called "PATHS Equity for Children--A program of research into what works to reduce the gap for Manitoba's children" (Canadian Institutes of Health Research, "PATHS Equity for Children"). PATHS itself is funding 16 different intervention programs geared towards helping to reduce the inequity gap in education and success among children ("PATHS Equity for Children"). One of those 16 intervention programs is called Early Intervention for ADHD, and it has been run by the University of Manitoba since 2007. The intervention program specifically sees that there is a well-proven connection between a child having Attention Deficit Hyperactivity  Disorder (ADHD) and how well the child does as a student in school, what kind of jobs the individual will be able to obtain and hold in the future, and the likelihood of being incarcerated as an adult. The intervention program has set out to discover if, through intervention, the researchers can reduce health and educational problems and socioeconomic inequities for its participants. The program hypothesizes that, due to intervention, fewer ADHD participants will be hospitalized, become involved in "substance abuse," and be less likely to become delinquents. The researchers of the program further hypothesize that participants will have better access to be more encouraged in "medication treatment," which will result in more educational success than those with ADHD who do not participate (University of Manitoba, "PATHS--Early Intervention for ADHD").

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