Provide a summary and analysis of “Woman to Man” and identify the theme. 

Judith Wright’s poem “Woman to Man” centers on childbirth. Its themes include the mysterious nature of childbirth, the religious aspect of childbirth, and the heterosexual component of childbirth. You could analyze the religious theme by discussing religious terminology like “resurrection.” You could analyze the mysterious theme by focusing on Wright’s use of enigmatic, haunting words. You could delve into the heterosexual emphasis by noting the gendered traits in the third stanza.

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Your summary of Judith Wright ’s poem “Woman to Man” could unfold stanza by stanza. In the first stanza, you meet the speaker. The speaker is holding a “seed.” In the second stanza, it becomes rather clear that the seed is an unnamed child. It appears to be the third...

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Your summary of Judith Wright’s poem “Woman to Man” could unfold stanza by stanza. In the first stanza, you meet the speaker. The speaker is holding a “seed.” In the second stanza, it becomes rather clear that the seed is an unnamed child. It appears to be the third child of the speaker. In the third stanza, the speaker seems to allude to the sexual act that created the child. The fourth stanza might reflect the anxieties and fears of childbirth.

Your summary should help you come up with themes. Childbirth seems to be the main theme of this poem, yet you can analyze childbirth in multiple ways.

For instance, you could analyze it in terms of heterosexuality. You could discuss how the makers of the child have gendered traits. “The strength that your arm knows” could refer to the male, since males are stereotypically linked to strength. “The arc of flesh that is my breast” could refer to the female, due to the stereotypical focus on breasts and bodily shape.

Another theme is religion. You could talk about how the speaker presents themselves as godlike. Lines like “this is the maker and the made” connect to the creative powers that are often assigned to a god. More so, the line in the first stanza that mentions “resurrection” connects childbirth to a Christ-like event.

Conversely, you could analyze the vulnerability of childbirth. Unlike gods, humans don’t know everything. They’re not all-powerful. The helpless, unknowing aspects of childbirth appear often in the poem. There is a lot that the speaker can’t grasp and is unable to see. The “shapeless seed,” the lack of a specific name, and the “blind head butting at the dark” all seem to reinforce the incomprehensible components of childbirth.

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