Provide a character analysis of the main character in the story "Araby." Provide evidence from the text.

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The unnamed narrator in "Araby" is a young adolescent with a crush on an older girl who is only named as "Mangan's sister." The narrator comes across as emotional, imaginative, romantic, sensitive, and dissatisfied with his dull Dublin schoolboy life.

As this young narrator notes, he bases his...

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The unnamed narrator in "Araby" is a young adolescent with a crush on an older girl who is only named as "Mangan's sister." The narrator comes across as emotional, imaginative, romantic, sensitive, and dissatisfied with his dull Dublin schoolboy life.

As this young narrator notes, he bases his crush on Mangan's sister mostly on his imagination, saying:

I had never spoken to her, except for a few casual words. . .

He knows very little about her, but nevertheless he projects romantic desires onto her. For example, to get through his mundane tasks in life in places "hostile to romance," such as marketing on Saturday evenings with his aunt, he keeps an idealized image of Mangan's sister in mind, saying:

I imagined that I bore my chalice [sacred cup: his imagined love for this girl] safely through a throng of foes.

His intensity of feeling pours out in the following passage, showing him to be emotional and sensitive:

Her name sprang to my lips at moments in strange prayers and praises which I myself did not understand. My eyes were often full of tears (I could not tell why) and at times a flood from my heart seemed to pour itself out into my bosom

At home he will murmurs the words "`O love! O love!' many times."

His dissatisfaction with his ordinary life emerges in his lack of attention to his schoolwork. The real world and its work seems "ugly" and "monotonous" in contrast to his romantic, imaginary world.

His emotional sensitivity becomes humiliating when he has a sudden realization or epiphany at the end of the story that the exotic world of the bazaar Araby he had conjured up is an illusion. He calls the illusion "vanity." Then, showing the intensity of his interior emotional life, he experiences an undue measure of shame for his mistakeā€”a mistake common to early adolescence:

Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish and anger.

In many ways, he is a typical young adolescent boy filled with emotional upheavals and growing pains as he matures.

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