Provide a character analysis of Sammy from "A&P" with evidence from the text.

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Sammy is the first-person narrator of "A & P," so the reader first has to decide whether to accept his version of events. This is a particularly exacting task since the story ends with Sammy impulsively standing up to his manager and quitting his job, a situation which all but...

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Sammy is the first-person narrator of "A & P," so the reader first has to decide whether to accept his version of events. This is a particularly exacting task since the story ends with Sammy impulsively standing up to his manager and quitting his job, a situation which all but the most scrupulous story-tellers would be inclined to exaggerate. Sammy's description of this episode, however, does not make him appear particularly brave or heroic. He barely knows why he is defying Lengel and begins to regret doing so even before he has finished, ruefully explaining that "once you begin a gesture it's fatal not to go through with it." He is also sufficiently self-aware to reflect that the impressiveness of his exit is dependent on the season, and is glad that it is summer so that he can leave without having to fumble with coat and galoshes.

The minute description of the girls at the beginning of the story shows that Sammy is not only highly observant but young, inexperienced, and starved of female company. He looks at the girls as an alien species, admitting that he does not understand how their minds work and questioning, in a burst of juvenile sexism, whether they even have minds. This type of comment, alongside his almost hypnotized fascination for the details of the female form, show that he is immature as well as impulsive, as does his final comprehension, a sickening revelation for him, of "how hard the world was going to be...hereafter."

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