Provide a brief history of sports management.

Although sports have always been managed, professional sports management as a business is a relatively recent phenomenon that arose in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, developing quickly and becoming more lucrative over the mid-twentieth century.

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Sports on a large scale have always required management. The Greek and Roman games were managed by the state, with high-ranking senators known as aediles being responsible for the latter. However, the management of individual athletes and teams for profit is a relatively recent development that seems to have begun...

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Sports on a large scale have always required management. The Greek and Roman games were managed by the state, with high-ranking senators known as aediles being responsible for the latter. However, the management of individual athletes and teams for profit is a relatively recent development that seems to have begun with horse-racing. The Jockey Club was founded in the eighteenth century (1750, or perhaps even earlier) to manage and regulate horse-racing in Britain. Clubs for other sports followed, and each of them developed standardized rules for the sport in question.

Sports management remained a largely amateur, gentlemanly affair that generated little money throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth century. It was in the middle years of the twentieth century that it came to be regarded as a serious business. To take one of the world's most famous sports teams as an example, Manchester United Football Club was founded in 1878 and, in its early years, made so little revenue that it almost went bankrupt. The first manager to make a strong impression on the club was Matt Busby, who arrived in 1945 and managed the club in the 1960s.

It was at this time that Manchester United and other football clubs began to pay large salaries to celebrity players, demand high ticket prices from spectators, and operate as businesses. The same pattern was observable in the United States, though matters moved somewhat faster, with teams such as the New York Yankees and the Brooklyn Dodgers (later the Los Angeles Dodgers) becoming deftly managed business concerns early in the twentieth century.

In the decades since the mid-twentieth century, the management of professional football, baseball, basketball, and a host of other sports has become ever more professional and lucrative, with celebrity managers paid multi-million dollar salaries.

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