In "Pride and Prejudice," do you think Lizzy marries Mr.Darcy out of love or for money, considering her feelings changed after she saw Pemberley? There is a lot of evidence that Lizzy provides throughout the book that suggests she could be marrying Mr.Darcy for the money and for Pemberley.

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While I get what you're saying, I just can't believe it to be true; Lizzy was a person who cared mostly for other people's character and kindness, not their money.  Her feelings changed after Pemberly because of the housekeeper's description of Darcy.  She describes him as an incredibly kind, loving, gracious, respectful man who cares about the people on his estate, and for his sister.  She, Darcy's servant, is the one to say these things, which is significant, because she is a servant in his household and could very well be bitter or resentful.  But she's not.  And then, when Darcy arrives on the scene, he is exactly as she had said-gracious, kind, welcoming and cordial.  He immediately makes her and her aunt and uncle feel welcome, and goes out of his way to be kind and accomodating.  So, while Pemberly was quite impressive, in her thoughts afterwards, it is not the mansion or estate that she dwells on.  It is Darcy's mannerisms, and the picture that others paint of his character.  Liz has always had more esteem for character than money, and Darcy's is starting to grow on her.  If you look in the chapters after the visit, Austen has Lizzy dwelling on his personality, and not his fortune.

In the beginning of the book, Lizzy was well aware of Darcy's fortune, but immediately dismissed him because of his rudeness to her and everyone at the ball.  That alone is evidence that she doesn't care for money if it is attached to such an aloof and condescendng personality.  Her visit to Pemberly wouldn't have made a difference at all without the housekeeper's kind words, and Darcy's impeccable behavior there.  That is what pushes her in his direction, not the estate, or money.

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