man and woman looking at one another and the woman is filled with plants and vines that are creeping into the man's body

Rappaccini's Daughter

by Nathaniel Hawthorne
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Pretend you are the little voice of reason inside Giovanni’s head in "Rappaccini's Daughter." What are you telling him? Now pretend you are his heart. What do you say?

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The answer to this question can go any direction that you would like. A lot of it will depend on your own personal attitude about love, pursuing relationships, and risks versus rewards. Your answer also might depend on whether or not you think that Giovanni is actually in love with...

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The answer to this question can go any direction that you would like. A lot of it will depend on your own personal attitude about love, pursuing relationships, and risks versus rewards. Your answer also might depend on whether or not you think that Giovanni is actually in love with Beatrice. Personally, I don't think that he is in real, true love with her. I think Giovanni is definitely attracted to her beauty, and her mystery doesn't hurt the attraction, either; however, I think that Giovanni sees Beatrice as more of a puzzle to be solved than a girl to be loved. It's why he is still testing her toxicity even late into the story. His "antidote" also sends the message that he is trying to change her, and that doesn't sound like love to me.

If I was the little voice or reason inside of Giovanni's head, I would be telling him to forget the girl and get as far away from her as possible. She is poisonous. Logically, Giovanni should know that he shouldn't go anywhere near her. Self preservation is far more important than figuring out a mystery about a beautiful girl that could kill you with a single touch. In my personal opinion, I think Giovanni's heart would be saying the same thing, but I think that because I've never believed he was ever in love with her in the first place.

If you want to argue that he is truly in love with her, then Giovanni's heart would be telling him that the antidote is a bad idea. His heart needs to realize that whatever Beatrice did to him allows him to be with her, and that is more important than anything, because true love is the ultimate goal.

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