Preparing to teach my seniors and want to incorporate poems, articles, even song lyrics that can be linked to "Brave New World". Any suggestions?My goal is to expose my students to a variety of...

Preparing to teach my seniors and want to incorporate poems, articles, even song lyrics that can be linked to "Brave New World". Any suggestions?

My goal is to expose my students to a variety of different devices while reading so they can create connections to texts, themselves, and the outside world.

1 Answer | Add Yours

mstultz72's profile pic

mstultz72 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Brave New World touches on many literary, cultural, and scientific themes and motifs, both current and timeless.  Such subtopics as satire, science fiction, dystopia, Shakespearean tragedy, cloning, the caste system, communism, mass production, and birth control make for ways in to the novel.

Here are some connections:

  • The Tempest by Shakespeare: John is based on the noble savage in the play.  Any of the monologues (which are poetry) are good drop-ins.
  • Cloning essays: the Taking Sides or Issues and Controversies books work great here: “Why We Should Ban Human Cloning” by George Annas vs. “Human Cloning and the Challenge of Regulation” by John A. Robertson in particular.
  • Songs: "Soma" by The Strokes or "Soma" by The Smashing Pumpkins

Soma is what they take when hard times opened their eyes / Saw pain in a new way / High stakes for a few names / Racing against sunbeams / Losing against fig trees

  • Films: Gattaca shows how parents can genetically engineer their children.  The film explores how the "faith births" are excluded from the utopia.
  • Media Essays: Neil Postman's epilogue to Amusing Ourselves to Death shows the current effects of media addiction and the pleasure principle.
  • Media: Look at the propaganda techniques used on TV, print magazines, advertising regarding the perfect society.
  • Pharmacology: Prozac Nation (film and book) excerpts are great for sparking debate on the over-medication of our children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’ve answered 318,911 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question