Be prepared to answer EVERY PART of the question using VERY SPECIFIC references to historical events and circumstances.  3. Discuss what factors will prepare the colonists in America to support...

Be prepared to answer EVERY PART of the question using VERY SPECIFIC references to historical events and circumstances. 

3. Discuss what factors will prepare the colonists in America to support the shift to the concept that “All Men Are Created Equal”. Include at least three and make sure describe them in detail (About 200 words)

Expert Answers
corinnedolci eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence in 1776, and in so doing he created a new nation and took humanity one step closer to recognizing the rights of all to participate in government. But, convincing a nation of colonists to revolt was not an easy step. A variety of philosophical, political, and social events played a part:

-In 1754, Jean-Jacques Rousseau published his "Discourse on Inequality" in Paris. Building upon Thomas Hobbes's concept of the state of nature, Rousseau defined what he saw as the natural state of man: a man who has the freedom to live, own property, and be happy. These philosophical ideals shifted contemporary thinking away from the dominant notion at the time, that political power was naturally endowed by God upon King George. If all men were naturally equal, then all men were naturally equal to govern.

-In 1765, King George and the British Parliament passed the Stamp Act. The Stamp Act taxed the colonists' use of stamps and other paper goods. This angered the colonists, because they did not have representation in British government. It also underscored the fact that, unlike other British citizens, the colonists didn't have a voice in their government. In other words, the British government was not respecting their right to have a say in government.

-In 1776, Thomas Paine published his widely-read pamphlet Common Sense. In it, he translated Rousseau's philosophical ideals into language for the common citizen and applied them to the actions of the British government. After its publication, popular opinion swayed toward revolution.