Is it possible to put something in the freezer to warm it up? Is it possible to put something in the freezer to warm it up? This is my weird homework question... gimme some help here... please.

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scarletpimpernel's profile pic

scarletpimpernel | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

This could also be a trick question on your teacher's part.  If the freezer is not turned on, then that would also work to thaw or "warm up" something that is frozen when you place it in the freezer.

lrwilliams's profile pic

lrwilliams | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

I would also have to agree, the definition of warming something up is to increase it's temperature. So if the item is colder than the temperature of your freezer and you place it in the freezer it will eventually increase in temperature to the level of the freezer.

lynn30k's profile pic

lynn30k | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

It will help if you think of it as a change in temperature, rather than "warming up". Then the question becomes, "If I put something in a freezer that starts out at a lower temperature than the freezer, what will happen to it?" Answer--the temperature will go up.

besure77's profile pic

besure77 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

Absolutely. If you place something that is 0 degrees into a freezer that in 15 degrees, eventually it will heat up to 15 degrees.

When people think of heat they think of the amount of warmness that something has so this is why it's hard to think as the freezer as a means to warm something up.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Yeah, I agree with Post #2.  Things warm up relative to what temperature they already are.  So something can get warmer even if it is put into some place that is cold -- it just has to be colder than the place it's put in.  You put frozen turkeys in the fridge to warm up gradually...

 

booksnmore's profile pic

booksnmore | College Teacher | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

It seems to me that if the item is far colder than the temperature of the freezer that, yes, it could "warm it up." Same idea as taking something out of the freezer and putting it into the fridge. The fridge is cold, but the freezer is colder, so we can thaw something in the fridge, all while staying cold. So if the freezer is at zero degrees, then couldn't something "warm up" that had been frozen at, say, minus 40 degrees? Just thinking aloud here...

pootle's profile pic

pootle | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) Honors

Posted on

Of course it is possible.

A freezer has a certain amount of warmth/energy; lets says it is -15 degrees C. This is NOT COLD. It is WARM. Less warm than temperatures that we like, perhaps, but it is still significantly above absolute zero and therefore it contains some energy/warmth.

If you put something that has less warmth into the freezer  (say, a rock whose temp is -30C) then according to the laws of thermodynamics the freezer will lose heat to the object of lower temperature.

A freezer is not cold. There is no such thing as cold!

jdeed's profile pic

jdeed | Student, College Freshman | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

I go along with post No. 2

You get things (Warmer) if you increase their Temperature.

I think people of Eskimos keep their food in Fridge to avoid getting them freezing   

 

krishna-agrawala's profile pic

krishna-agrawala | College Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

No. Unless the question is some kind of trick question, this is a very clear and correct answer to it. When we talk of a freezer in normal language it means an appliances for keeping things at temperature lower than that of the ambient temperature of the environment within which is is kept. Thus it makes no sense in talking of freezer which maintains temperature inside it that is higher than the ambient temperature. Further, even if we keep an inside a freezer something - for example, dry ice - which is at lower temperature than the inside of freezer, the rate of rise within the freezer will be lower because of the insulation of the freezer and also the lower temperature inside the freezer. Thus if the intention is to warm up the object rather than to keep it cooler for longer period, it is better not to put it insife the freezer.

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