Is it possible to have a child whose blood type is A if both of the parents are type O? 

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A child's blood group (also known as blood type) is dependent on the blood group of his/her parents. The possible blood groups are A, B, AB, and O. Since there are 4 possible blood types of the mother and 4 possible blood types of the father, there are effectively 16...

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A child's blood group (also known as blood type) is dependent on the blood group of his/her parents. The possible blood groups are A, B, AB, and O. Since there are 4 possible blood types of the mother and 4 possible blood types of the father, there are effectively 16 possible combinations of the blood type of the resulting offspring.

Each parent donates one of their ABO alleles to the offspring. Thus, a parent with O blood type will donate O, and a parent with a blood type AB will donate either A or B alleles. Using this analogy, if both the parents have a blood type O, each will donate O allele to the offspring and hence the resulting offspring will have a blood type of O.

Thus, if both the parents have O blood group (or type), the child cannot have a blood group A.

Hope this helps.

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