Why would the point in which Pony, Johnny, and Dally rescue the children in the burning church be a climax?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

The point in the story in which Dally, Ponyboy, and Johnny rescue the children from the burning church would definitely be considered a climactic moment in the novel.  The climax is defined as the point of highest emotion or the turning point.  This event would definitely be a...

See
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Get 48 Hours Free Access

The point in the story in which Dally, Ponyboy, and Johnny rescue the children from the burning church would definitely be considered a climactic moment in the novel.  The climax is defined as the point of highest emotion or the turning point.  This event would definitely be a turning point.  The three boys decide to forget about their own lives and risk themselves to save these school children.  Because they have done this, many things in their lives have changed.  Ponyboy is reunited with his brothers; Johnny dies; Dally shows his emotional side; Ponyboy realizes that the Socs are more like the Greasers than he could ever have imagined and he realizes the value of his life.  None of these things would have occurred if they had not gone into that church – hence, this is why this event is the climax.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team