Point of view in regards to death theme?How does the first person collective point of view contribute to the theme of death? The only "evidence," so to speak, that I was able to find...

Point of view in regards to death theme?

How does the first person collective point of view contribute to the theme of death? The only "evidence," so to speak, that I was able to find included physical descriptions of Miss Emily as being bloated and resembling a drowned body....

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pmiranda2857 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

The narrator, who speaks on behalf of the entire town, gives us evidence of the theme of death from the beginning of the story in his attitude towards Miss Emily. 

She is a symbol for the death of the Old South.  Looked upon with respect, in the same way that Civil War soldiers were regarded, the men of the town assemble at her funeral to say farewell to an icon whose time had long since past, but one who should be honored nonetheless.

"Alive, Miss Emily had been a tradition, a duty, and a care; a sort of hereditary obligation upon the town, dating from that day in 1894" (Faulkner)

Miss Emily denies her father's death.  She ignores the fact that he died for three days.  

"The day after his death all the ladies prepared to call at the house and offer condolence and aid, as is our custom. Miss Emily met them at the door, dressed as usual and with no trace of grief on her face. She told them that her father was not dead. She did that for three days, with the ministers calling on her, and the doctors, trying to persuade her to let them dispose of the body. Just as they were about to resort to law and force, she broke down, and they buried her father quickly." (Faulkner)

Another example of the theme of death is Miss Emily's treatment of Homer Barron, the Yankee worker she fell in love with and subsequently killed.  His body is found in a locked room, a corpse that Emily has slept next to for many years.

abbyf92 | Student

I don't get the question but the answer above seems to be extremely helpful

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A Rose for Emily

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