Point of View of The most dangerous game? help please! What is the point of view of The Most Dangerous Game? Can someone please help me understand what the point of view of the most dangerous game... i think it may be third person omniscient but i'm not 100% sure. Please help, thank you!

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The short story "The Most Dangerous Game" is written using third person limited narration. A third person limited narrator focuses on one character's feelings, thoughts, and emotions throughout the story without in-depth knowledge of the other characters' thoughts or feelings. One can also recognize third person limited narration through the narrator's use of third person pronouns like "his," "they," and "she." Connell uses third person limited narration by focusing on Rainsford's thoughts and feelings throughout the story. In contrast, a third person omniscient narrator knows the thoughts, feelings, and emotions of every character in the story and gives the author more range and freedom to tell the story. If Connell were to tell the short story using third person omniscient narration, the reader would understand General Zaroff, Ivan, and Whitney's thoughts and feelings.

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You are right. It is third person omniscient point of view. The best place to judge the point of view is in the narration, not the dialogue. In the narration, the author tells us what Ransford is thinking. After Rainsford falls in and swims toward the sound of the shots, he arrives at the island very hungry. A pistol shot means people and and people mean food he thinks. Only an omnisicent narrator can tell us the thoughts and feelings of a character in a story. A third person objective narrator could not tell the reader anything but the facts he sees and hears. A first person narrator would have the character using the pronoun "I", rather than referring to himself in the third person, like Rainsford stroked for the island.

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