Is the point of view in "A Dog's Tale" by Mark Twain objective or omniscient?

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To be able to answer this question, let's have a look at the various points of view in literature.

In the first-person point of view, the narrator tells a story from their own perspective using the pronouns "I" or "we." The reader has direct access to the thoughts, emotions, and...

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To be able to answer this question, let's have a look at the various points of view in literature.

In the first-person point of view, the narrator tells a story from their own perspective using the pronouns "I" or "we." The reader has direct access to the thoughts, emotions, and experiences of the person (or people) telling the story.

In the second-person point of view, the protagonist of the story is addressed using the pronoun "you." This is not often used when telling stories.

In the third-person point of view, the story is told by someone who is not a character in the story, using pronouns such as "he," "she," and "they." The third-person point of view is subdivided into three subcategories. In the third-person objective point of view, the reader does not have access to any of the characters' thoughts. In the third-person limited point of view, the reader has access to one character's thoughts only. In the third-person omniscient point of view, the reader has access to the thoughts of all the characters.

In the short story "A Dog's Tale" by Mark Twain, the dog tells her own story from a first-person point of view. The first-person point of view is distinct from objective or omniscient points of view, which are both subcategories of third-person. So, the answer to the question is that the point of view of "A Dog's Tale" is neither objective nor omniscient.

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There are several ways in which literary critics think about the types of narrators in fiction. The first way is to divide them by person:

  1. First person narrators use first person pronouns such as "I", "me", and "my" to describe themselves.
  2. Second person narrators describe the characters of the story in the second person as "you". Although this is a common voice for non-fiction (especially "how-to" articles or manuals), and sometimes used in video games, it is quite rare in fiction.
  3. Third person narrators describe the characters of the story using third-person pronouns such as "she", "he", or "they". 

Narrators are also classified by the limitations of their knowledge, by whether they directly address the reader (breaking the illusion of the story), and their degree of reliability or objectivity.

"A Dog's Tale" by Mark Twain is narrated in the first person by the dog of the title, Aileen Mavourneen. The point of view is limited rather than omniscient, as the dog narrator only has access to information she experiences or overhears; she does not describe the internal thoughts of other characters in the story. 

As a narrator, the dog is reliable in so far as she does not lie, and she tells the truth as she understands it. Her understanding, however, is quite limited. In general, the term "objective" would apply only to a third-person narrator, not a first-person one, as the first-person point of view is inherently subjective, viewing the elements of the story through the experience of one character.

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