point out what changes are made in the adaptation of the novel PRIDE AND PREJUDICE in terms of: Story, Characters and Language?i need this for my prelium assignment. plz help me.

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accessteacher's profile pic

accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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If you are referring to the BBC version (which is, in my opinion, the best adaptation of this novel, even though I really liked the Keira Knightley version that came out more recently) you have identified one of the key differences, which is the start of the film where Bingley and Darcy are riding to have a look at Netherfield. A vital change between the novel and the production is that the novel contains no episodes of men talking together - they are hidden from what is predominantly a female world. We see everything in the novel from a female's point of view - the private world of men is excluded from us. Another clip we don't see in the novel but is in the film is when Darcy confesses his pride and mistakes to Bingley in keeping him apart from Jane, and gives him his blessing to go and propose to her. Thus the adaptation presents us with small glimpses of this manly world that are absent in the novel.

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Karen P.L. Hardison | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

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An adaptation of a written novel, in this case Pride and Prejudice, generally requires quite a few changes because the media of print and visualizing film are so very different. One of the most prominent adaptations is adapting Jane Austen's strong narratorial voice into a film version. This has consistently been done in film versions by assigning the narrator's choicest and most important lines to characters.

Another--annoyingly--common adaptation is to invert the physical qualities of Jane and Elizabeth. Jane is declared by the Austen narrator to be not only the most kind and sweet tempered sister who is indispensable to the happiness of every other sister and her mother and father but she is also described as elegantly tall and well figured and very much more beautiful than Elizabeth. Filmmakers just cannot bring themselves to break the heroine-beauty connection.

Another even more annoying adaptation is to render Austen's realistic yet eccentric characters--who were unanimously adjudged by contemporaneous readers to resemble real people that readers truly knew in society--as Dickensian caricatures, thus wrongly creating Uriah Heeps and Aunt Betsys and worse in the Austen world. Most often though the language--in terms of words though not in terms of character delivery (caricatures cannot speak like real albeit eccentric people)--of Austen is remarkably well respected as is the essential storyline and plot, though for reasons of time constraints, all are shortened to fit film's requirements.

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tresvivace | College Teacher | (Level 2) Assistant Educator

Posted on

We would love to be able to help you with this question, but it is impossible to answer unless we know what the adaptation is.  Perhaps you watched one of the movie versions of Pride and Prejudice; if you did, that would be an "adaptation" and you would be telling what the difference is between the movie adaptation and the book.  There are several movie versions available, and if this is the adaptation the question refers to, we don't know which version you watched. Or you might have seen a play (stage) adaptation or possibly you read an abridged (shortened) version, or adaptation, of the novel.  An adaptation means that somehow the novel was changed, and for us to help you with the question, we'd need to know what the adaptation is.

shafiwazir's profile pic

shafiwazir | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 3) eNoter

Posted on

An adaptation of a written novel, in this case Pride and Prejudice, generally requires quite a few changes because the media of print and visualizing film are so very different. One of the most prominent adaptations is adapting Jane Austen's strong narratorial voice into a film version. This has consistently been done in film versions by assigning the narrator's choicest and most important lines to characters.

Another--annoyingly--common adaptation is to invert the physical qualities of Jane and Elizabeth. Jane is declared by the Austen narrator to be not only the most kind and sweet tempered sister who is indispensable to the happiness of every other sister and her mother and father but she is also described as elegantly tall and well figured and very much more beautiful than Elizabeth. Filmmakers just cannot bring themselves to break the heroine-beauty connection.

Another even more annoying adaptation is to render Austen's realistic yet eccentric characters--who were unanimously adjudged by contemporaneous readers to resemble real people that readers truly knew in society--as Dickensian caricatures, thus wrongly creating Uriah Heeps and Aunt Betsys and worse in the Austen world. Most often though the language--in terms of words though not in terms of character delivery (caricatures cannot speak like real albeit eccentric people)--of Austen is remarkably well respected as is the essential storyline and plot, though for reasons of time constraints, all are shortened to fit film's requirements.

compare and contrast oedipus rex and the wild duck.

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epollock | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

There are so many differences, it all depends on what version you are talking about.  There is an 8 hour movie, a 2 hour movie, an animated series, and others. Simply filming leaves out much description, and with music, the tone of certain scenes can change. Also, the personality of the characters are divergent due to different actors and actresses strengths and weaknesses. 

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ventures | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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Mrs. Bennet wishes she had had sons, in front of the girls. In the book, she never says so Mary philosophizes on life’s trials, Lydia declares she is hungry. Jane and Elizabeth talk about their hopes and prospects of marriage. Jane wishes her family goodnight before going to bed. Mr. Bennet is going over the accounts. All of this, though characteristic of the family members, is not in the book Mr. Bennet is surprised that Darcy slighted Elizabeth, she says she doesn’t care. To Mrs. Bennet’s suggestion that she never dance with him even if he asks her to later, she says she can safely promise never to dance with him. In the book, on returning to Longbourn after the ball, Mrs. Bennet describes Darcy’s insult to Mr. Bennet, neither his reaction nor Elizabeth’s is mentioned.
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ventures | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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there are a lot of differences look just in the first scene Darcy and Bingly come on the horseback this is nowhere in the book.

 

 

nusratfarah's profile pic

nusratfarah | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted on

If you watch the BBC version of the movie, I think that, you'll hardly find any adaptation or I should better say any distortion in the story, language or characters. If you haven't already, watch it. It's lengthy, but has been able to preserve the real essence as far as possible.

shafiwazir's profile pic

shafiwazir | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 3) eNoter

Posted on

By adaptation i mean what changes are their in the movie of pride and prejudice after reading its origional text? it must be clear to you that the changes must be in characters , story and language.

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