poetrywho is you favorite poet why? please write a line from his/her poetry if you would like to do so

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lmetcalf | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

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I have several favorite poets depending on my mood or purpose, but I will share that one of my absolute favorite poems is "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock."  It is so rich and complex that I notice something new every time I read it.  Amazing to think that Eliot wrote it as a freshman at Harvard.

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Wallace Stevens wrote in an essay in later life that "the great poems of heaven and hell have been written and the great poem of the earth remains to be written."  He held that, in a time when religion no longer satifies, poetry must.  Perhaps, his "Sunday Morning" does just this for some.  Certainly, there is a cornucopia of the imagination in his poety:

Sunday Morning

Complacencies of the peignoir, and late

Coffee and oranges in a sunny chair,

And the green freedom of a cockatoo

Upon a rug mingle to dissipate

The holy hush of ancient sacrifice.

She dreams a little, and she feels the dark

Encroachment of that old catastrophe,

As a calm darkens among water-lights.

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jmj616 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

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Edmund Spenser and then Geoffrey Chaucer (e.g., The Book of the Duchess) are my all-time favorites, but I like William Cowper also, though no longer much thought of. One thing Cowper has in his favor is that when I read him aloud, my Maine Coon mix kitty bursts into a purr, runs across the room, jumps up on my lap, curls up, and settles in for the duration of the reading. She's a real fan!

My father once had a cat that liked cantaloupe, but  a cat that likes Cowper--that's somethin' else!

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Karen P.L. Hardison | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

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Edmund Spenser and then Geoffrey Chaucer (e.g., The Book of the Duchess) are my all-time favorites, but I like William Cowper also, though no longer much thought of. One thing Cowper has in his favor is that when I read him aloud, my Maine Coon mix kitty bursts into a purr, runs across the room, jumps up on my lap, curls up, and settles in for the duration of the reading. She's a real fan!

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brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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I have two, one well known and one not.  Raymond Carver, from the Yakima Valley, I think was extremely talented.  I read and re-read his collections all the time.

Dan Peters is another one.  I went to high school with him and he has published widely since then, won several awards and runs a Yakima, Washington publisher called Blue Begonia Press.

The house next door
burned down that summer
and was torn apart.
Even the foundation
was coming out.
We lived so close,
a lilac tree touched both houses.
One side of it burned.

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jmj616 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

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I find myself going back a lot to Robert Frost.  His poetry is regular in meter, often rhymes, and is almost always clear in meaning.  And yet there are so many lines that leave us with so much to think about.

Take, for example, the poem "Out, Out."  It is a clearly told narrative of a boy who injures his hand while cutting wood with a bandsaw, needs to be operated on, and dies on the operating table.  Interspersed in the narrative are several thought-provoking comments:

(Just before the accident occurs):

Call it a day, I wish they might have said
To please the boy by giving him the half hour
That a boy counts so much when saved from work.

(Just after the accident):

Then the boy saw all--
Since he was old enough to know, big boy
Doing a man's work, though a child at heart--
He saw all spoiled.

(After the boy dies):

And they, since they
Were not the one dead, turned to their affairs

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I can't say that I have just one favorite poet, but I really like A.E. Housman.  I think I like him because of how evocative and sad his poems are.  They make me appreciate how beautiful life is while we have it.  I also love the rhythms of his poetry.

A stanza from one of his poems that shows both of these things is this last stanza from "Loveliest of Trees."

And since to look at things in bloom
Fifty springs are little room,
About the woodlands I will go
To see the cherry hung with snow.

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