In the poem "Song of myself" by Walt Whitman, what are poetic devices, structure and themes metaphors personification etc. in section 52 of this poem?

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Section 52 is the conclusion of Song of Myself, in which the poet imagines his death as a sort of sublime integration with the world. Whitman’s language is powerful and evocative. He imagines the spotted hawk as his companion, complaining of “my gab and my loitering.” This is a kind of anthropomorphism, in which the poet projects human qualities on the hawk, except here it works in a reverse way: Whitman projects qualities of the hawk onto himself! He too sounds his “barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world” (“yawp” is a made-up word meant to sound like the cry of the bird and so is an example of onomatopoeia). Like the hawk, “the last scud of day holds back for me,” and, with the bird, he disappears into “the vapor and the dark.”

The second half of the section is marked by a shift in the grammatical repetition (or anaphora) Whitman uses to build rhythm in his language:

I depart as air, I shake my white locks...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 526 words.)

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