in the poem sohrab and rustum why does mathew arnold uses nature to describe the terrible scene? i want the role that nature plays in the poem  

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This epic poem, which takes place in a place and time far removed from Arnold’s own world and experience, constructs a fictive past, war-like, chaotic, uncivilized by Victorian England standards, does not submit to personal analysis; it is an objective, not a subjective, poem, one that describes in poetic language...

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This epic poem, which takes place in a place and time far removed from Arnold’s own world and experience, constructs a fictive past, war-like, chaotic, uncivilized by Victorian England standards, does not submit to personal analysis; it is an objective, not a subjective, poem, one that describes in poetic language an event, and does not function as a personal statement by the poet himself.  The Iliad and Odyssey are the most familiar in this genre.  Arnold’s use of nature is confined to the effect of Nature on the battle he is describing.  It is a wrong-headed stretch to try to find sympathetic natural occurrences that reflect or frame the human actions, except in the respect that human traditions (the gender of the first-born, for example) are “natural.”  Arnold, in keeping with this form, is much more concerned with telling the “epic story” than with poetic embellishments.  We are well past the Romantic era in Arnold’s England, and far removed from the immediacy of Nature, and even farther from deifying natural forces.

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