She Walks in Beauty Questions and Answers
by Lord George Gordon Byron

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In the poem "She Walks in Beauty," identify some poetry devices, such as alliteration, hyperbole, rhyme, rhythm, and imagery.

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Perhaps the most important device used in this poem is the recurring motif of light and dark imagery which runs throughout the poem ("dark and bright . . . tender light . . . raven tress . . . glow") and which reflects the speaker's declaration that the woman's beauty is a perfect, harmonious balance between light and dark. Her beauty glows, but is also, like the dark, mysterious.

In the opening line of the poem, Byron uses a simile ("like the night") to compare the woman's beauty to a beautiful, "cloudless" night of "starry skies." In the same stanza, he then uses hyperbole to suggest that, by comparison to the "tender" glow which her beauty emits, the sun provides the day with a "gaudy" light.

There is also a lot of parallelism in the poem, where the second half of a line echoes the grammatical structure of the first. For example, "One shade the more, one ray the less" and...

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