In the poem 'i remember, i remember' by Philip Larkin what is meant be 'comic ford'?i really enjoyed this poem but i am not sure what he means by 'comic ford', i think it might be like jokes but im...

In the poem 'i remember, i remember' by Philip Larkin what is meant be 'comic ford'?

i really enjoyed this poem but i am not sure what he means by 'comic ford', i think it might be like jokes but im not sure and just wanted to check. i also wanted to know if anyone else has read the poem and enjoyed it because i thought it was really good.

Asked on by jenny2010

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jmj616's profile pic

jmj616 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted on

The reference to the "comic Ford" is a little unclear.

My guess is that it refers to a Ford automobile, one that was in some way "comic"; perhaps it was scratched and dented in a funny way, perhaps it made funny noises, or had a funny way of breaking down at the most innopportune times.

The main idea of the poem is that the author has returned to the town where he grew up, but he finds that he does not have particularly fond memories of it.

The author refers to the town as the place "where my childhood was unspent."  He visits the family garden, which he recalls was "where I did not invent / Blinding theologies of flowers and fruits" (italics added).  He cynically refers to his "splendid family [that] / I never ran to when I got depressed."

When the author mentions the "comic Ford," he seems to be continuing the list of fond memories that he does not have. 

Like many people have discovered through hard experience, "you can't go home again" (see the first link below). 
 

lit24's profile pic

lit24 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

The expression "comic ford" occurs in the fifth stanza of the poem:

I never ran to when I got depressed,
The boys all biceps and the girls all chest,
Their comic Ford, their farm where I could be
'Really myself'.

It could mean either a ford motor car or a toy model of a ford motor car.

The language used in the poem is conversational yet poetic, exaggerating slightly, as memory is wont to do, the significant events in the speaker's childhood. The events which seem to have been so important to him in his childhood he now denies, which show a reluctance in the speaker to revisit and share his past with his friend. The dissatisfaction and disdain felt by the speaker for his childhood is obvious, especially in the tone of the last line - 'Nothing, like something, happens anywhere.' This line is a powerful ending to the poem.

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