In the poem "The Raven" by Poe, do you think there is really a raven in the speaker's chambers? Why or why not?

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An interesting question. You could make a fair argument for both answers, particularly because Poe is of course a writer who delights in the supernatural: things often appear in his works which do not "really" exist in our world but which, nevertheless, are real to the characters in the work. In this poem, the raven who appears in the speaker's chamber could arguably just be a real bird that has come in through the window out of the storm. He doesn't really speak to the narrator at any length—he only says "nevermore," one word. Corvids, including ravens, are notoriously capable of imitating human speech; the narrator is in a sad state of mind and may be imagining that the Raven, with its one learned word, is actually responding to what he is saying.

On the other hand, we can argue that the speaker has imagined the raven, not least because at the beginning of the poem, the speaker is falling asleep—he is...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 503 words.)

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