In the poem "Out, Out," how does Robert Frost create a sense of tragedy and drama?Please give me soem ideas for this essay I have got to make it 1200 words. more on the thems of the play and less...

In the poem "Out, Out," how does Robert Frost create a sense of tragedy and drama?

Please give me soem ideas for this essay I have got to make it 1200 words. more on the thems of the play and less on the evaluation of the play itself

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stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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The poem "Out, Out - " starts with a description of the scene, the coming to an end of a normal day in a beautiful, mountainous area of Vermont. The scenery is breathtaking, with "five mountain ranges one behind the other under the sunset far into Vermont," but the glory of the surroundings is lost on the young boy engaged in his chores - work that the poem's narrator considers too hard for one of his age and size.

Call it a day, I wish they might have said to please the boy by giving him the half hour that a boy counts so much when saved from work...a man's work, though a child at heart

So the sense of foreboding is presented and the drama starts to build early on in the image of the snarling, rattling chain saw being used by the youngster whose size is overpowered by the tool.

The unexpectedness of the accident is emphasized by the way in which it is described, attempting to place blame on the saw before conceding that blame really wasn't the issue - the important thing was that it happened.

the saw, as if it meant to prove that saws know what supper meant, leaped out at the boy's hand...He must have given the hand. However it was, neither refused the meeting.

Despite his youth, the boy immediately understands the seriousness and the dire consequences of the accident and begs his sister, "Don't let him cut my hand off - the doctor, when he comes." Frost doesn't describe the scene as those present await the doctor's arrival, allowing the imagination of the readers to become involved in the unfolding of the drama by supplying the details of what must have been happening.

There is no return to the questioning of whether or not the boy should have been using the saw in the first place, however - the accident has occurred, life moves on, now all must deal with the aftermath. Is the real tragedy the accident, the need for children to do the work of adults, the destruction of nature (such as the cutting of firewood), or something else?

The boy doesn't actually anticipate the ultimate result of the accident. He was concerned about losing his hand, not his life. The irony of the situation is told, again, with minimal detail so that the reader is drawn into the situation as the unstated is imagined.

And then - the watcher at his pulse took a fright.  No one believed. They listened to his heart. Little - less - nothing! - and that ended it.

And in the final stage of the drama, those present appear to be unconcerned and untouched by what has happened. Again, the readers are left to consider what unstated emotions may have been present, and whether the tragedy is the death or the uncaring reaction of the survivors.

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