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In the poem "in Just-" by E. E. Cummings, the balloonman is described as "lame," "queer," and "goat-footed."  What is his significance in the poem?

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In the poem "in Just-" by E. E. Cummings, the narrator writes with the delight and exuberance of a child of the coming of spring. Even puddles and mud take on joyful aspects. Children enjoy playing marbles, hop-scotch, jump-rope, and pretending they are pirates. The poet's distain for grammar, capitalization, and proper line-spacing adds to the carefree playfulness of the poem.

However, "in-Just" is not only about children cavorting in springtime. The balloonman is not a child. In fact, he may not even be human. According to the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, the word "queer" is defined as "differing in some way from what is usual or normal: odd, strange, weird." One way in which the balloonman is different is the shape of his feet. He is described as lame because he does not have normal human feet. He is goat-footed, which means he has cloven hooves instead of feet and toes.

In fact, the balloonman represents Pan, the Greek god of lecherous sexuality. He calls to all the children to...

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