In the poem "Human Abstract" by William Blake, what does the line "he sits down with holy fears" mean?

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It is important to know that this poem personifies a lot.  Cruelty is a person.  Humility, Mercy, and Mystery are, too. The line that you are asking about says "he sits down with holy fears."  

Okay, who is he?  If a reader reads only that stanza (stanza 3), there...

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It is important to know that this poem personifies a lot.  Cruelty is a person.  Humility, Mercy, and Mystery are, too. The line that you are asking about says "he sits down with holy fears."  

Okay, who is he?  If a reader reads only that stanza (stanza 3), there isn't an answer.  A reader must look to the previous stanza's second couplet

"Then Cruelty knits a snare, 
And spreads his baits with care."

Now we're getting somewhere.  "He" and "Cruelty" are the same person.  In this case, Cruelty is part of human nature.  At this point Blake is beginning to describe the planting and growing of a metaphorical tree.  Cruelty is sitting down to water the tree.  He waters it with his tears that came from holy fears.  And out sprouts humility.  

"Then Humility takes its root 
Underneath his foot." 

What Blake is saying is that he believes the only reason that people attempt to be humble and merciful is because they have "holy fears."  They fear eternal damnation if they do not act with humble kindness.  It's an interesting thought, because what Blake is saying is that without the tears of holy fear to water humility, Cruelty would rule alone.  That would be a scary world to live in. 

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