In the poem"Falling Song," how do the images connect to the theme of the poem? The poem is below.There was the sweet but reedyhonking of geese coming downthis morning with rain overrush hour...

In the poem"Falling Song," how do the images connect to the theme of the poem? The poem is below.

There was the sweet but reedy
honking of geese coming down
this morning with rain over
rush hour streets, coming
through like bells that celebrate.

I got right up, pushing up
close to the sooty window
pane. I peered out and up through
the weather, imagining
that that line of winged dots would

be shifting as if waves moved
easily through them, as if
waves floated them south. I wanted
to catch them riding, spots on
the wake of the wind, marking

the certain direction of
their migration. But I got
no satisfaction. Mist kept
them mysterious, quickly
dampening their call. Leaning

over the sill, I gaped at
a window shade dull sky, at
a hollow city, and felt
like I'd missed a parade I
would have wanted to follow.

Asked on by jakielegs

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

In the poem "Falling Song" by Daniel David Morris, the speaker is yearning to feel connected to nature but is trapped in the confines of the city.  This is the primary theme of the piece.  The primary image which represents nature is, of course, the geese.  They are majestic and free, flying high above the grey, the rain, and the "rush hour streets."  The geese fly over, "coming through like bells that celebrate."  He compares their formation to waves and wind--ever shifting, ever changing.  He is enraptured by their temporary but majestic presence and their freedom.  As they fly out of sight, he said he

felt
like I'd missed a parade I
would have wanted to follow.

He wants to fly and get caught up and be free with the geese; but the "sooty window" and the "mist" are "dampening their call" and he remains stuck in the city.

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