Please paraphrase or summarize Wordsworth's poem "Daffodils." Please include an explanation of sound devices and figures of speech used in the poem.

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The narrator of this poem wanders around the English Lake District in spring, feeling lonely. He stumbles unexpectedly on the scene of thousands of daffodils blowing in the wind beside a lake. They look like they are alive and doing a joyous dance. The narrator is enthralled with this scene....

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The narrator of this poem wanders around the English Lake District in spring, feeling lonely. He stumbles unexpectedly on the scene of thousands of daffodils blowing in the wind beside a lake. They look like they are alive and doing a joyous dance. The narrator is enthralled with this scene. It fills him with happiness. He later recollects the joy of this moment when he is indoors at home, and he is made happy again.

Wordsworth uses an even, rhythmic meter called iambic tetrameter that seems to dance back and forth just as the daffodils do. Each line has eight beats, which gives the lines more of a singsong rhythm than the longer, ten-syllabled, iambic pentameter. In each line, an iamb, which is an unaccented syllable, is followed by an accented syllable, on which the stress falls, such as in the following line (the accented syllables are capped):

beSIDE the LAKE, beNEATh the TREES.

Wordsworth uses the ABABCC rhyme scheme. Having the last couplet in each stanza rhyme creates a sense of closure. The iambic tetrameter and the regular rhyme scheme both envelop the reader in a sense of comfort and security because they are so regular, like the rocking of a cradle. This mirrors the comfort the daffodils give the narrator.

The other answer has discussed metaphor and personification, both important literary devices. I would add repetition, which slows the reader down, in the third stanza:

I gazed—and gazed

This captures how arrested the speaker was by the scene. The daffodils caught and held his attention.

Wordsworth also uses alliteration, which is to repeat the same consonant at the beginning of words. This also creates a sense of rhythm. This occurs with "glee," "gay," and "gazed" in the third stanza.

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Wordsworth's daffodils poem (often called "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud," after the first line) is a simple poem that provides a superb example of Romantic literature. Not much happens within the poem itself. The narrator is originally wandering out in the wild in a lonely and dejected state, until he happens upon a field of daffodils. The sight of the cheery flowers improves the speaker's mood considerably. The narrator ends the poem by saying that the memory of those daffodils always cheers him up whenever he finds himself in a sullen mood.

Despite the poem's simple subject matter, Wordsworth employs some complex figurative language to get his message across. The most significant device that Wordsworth uses is metaphor. The poem abounds with examples of metaphor, such as "I wandered lonely as a cloud" (1), and "[Daffodils] Continuous as the stars that shine/ And twinkle in the milky way" (7-8). By using these metaphors, Wordsworth brings the world of nature to life, turning it into a dynamic entity with a personality all its own. He also employs personification to heighten this effect, saying that the flowers were "tossing their heads in sprightly dance" (12). As for sound devices, the poem follows a simple but effective rhyme scheme of ABABCC, thus providing the piece with an easy-to-follow and reliably musical sound. All in all, it's Wordsworth's skilled and creative use of sound and figurative devices that transform the simple experience of appreciating flowers into a monumental milestone of English literature. 

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