Please provide an analysis of Sandra Scheetz-Wise's painting "Deforestation."

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Scheetz-Wise's piece is a surreal meditation on mankind's relationship to the environment in the present age. The title, "Deforestation," leaves no doubt about this, though even without it most observers would probably understand that the intention is to show a denuded landscape with remnants of humanity camped on it.

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Scheetz-Wise's piece is a surreal meditation on mankind's relationship to the environment in the present age. The title, "Deforestation," leaves no doubt about this, though even without it most observers would probably understand that the intention is to show a denuded landscape with remnants of humanity camped on it.

Are these figures actually human? It's not clear if they are human, mutants, humanoids, androids, or still something else for which we don't have the ready terminology. Some of them are lying dead on the ground, indicating that deforestation is killing off the humanoids as well as the vegetation. The latter still exist as stripped branches held aloft by these figures, perhaps like trophies of the "conquest" of nature man has carried out. The also appear as antler-like extensions to these beings if one doesn't look closely enough to see that they're being held in the humanoids' hands.

Along with scattered stumps on the ironically green surface we see axes, one of them buried in a random log and one buried in a dead humanoid's leg. The symbolism is obvious that in chopping down the forests, mankind are killing themselves at the same time. In the background, we see dolphins leaping and plunging into the earth, having been deprived of their ocean habitat. Or, could it be that land and ocean have merged into one?

Interestingly, the humanoid figures are female, with hourglass figures, and wear scarves covering their heads and mouths. Is this protection against the toxic environment or against disease, or is it some other symbol, perhaps having to do with the oppression of women? The dead ones appear to have been chopped in pieces like trees, so what at first might have appeared quasi-mechanical beings are more like a merging of human/animal and vegetable. These are tree-people, and the amalgam reinforces the fact that humans, in destroying the environment, are committing suicide. Man is one with the environment, and without understanding that, self-destruction is inevitable.

Painted in the sky are, in place of clouds, large elongated shapes like spaceships, filled with dots like stars or artificial lights. These images are open to wide interpretation. Are they part of nature, or are they in fact spacecraft or floating cities to which some of the population have escaped? Like most paintings, this is one in which the more one looks at it, the more one sees and the greater the meaning that unfolds. Perhaps this analysis has only scratched the surface.

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