Please provide a summative explanation of Chapters 12 and 13 of Frankenstein.

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His physical appearance notwithstanding, the creature reveals himself in Chapters 12 and 13 to be much akin to the noble innocent of The Romantic Rousseau's writings.  When he discovers the Delacey family, his response to is benevolent and sympathetic; their "gentle manners and beauty...greatly endeared them" to him, and when they suffer,...

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His physical appearance notwithstanding, the creature reveals himself in Chapters 12 and 13 to be much akin to the noble innocent of The Romantic Rousseau's writings.  When he discovers the Delacey family, his response to is benevolent and sympathetic; their "gentle manners and beauty...greatly endeared them" to him, and when they suffer, the creature agonizes for them. Likewise, he is sympathetic to nature and derives joy from its beauty:

"The pleasant showers and genial warmth of spring greatly altered the aspect of the earth....The birds sang in more cheerful notes, and the leaves began to bud forth on the trees.  Happy, happy earth!  fit habitation for gods, which, so short a time before, was bleak, damp, and unwholesome.  My spirits were elevated by the enchanting appearance of nature; the past was blotted from my memory, the present was tranquil, and the future gilded by bright ray of hope and anticipations of joy."

From his observation of the misery and melancholy of the cottagers, the creature endeavors to help them by gathering wood and replenishing their supply for fire.  He endeavors to learn their language so that he might speak to them if given the opportunity. Thus, as the renowned literary critic Harold Bloom has written,

The greatest paradox and most astonishing achievement of Mary Shelley's novel is that the monster is more human than his creator."

With these two chapters, Shelley develops a sensitive creature who is noble in nature and who desires only to be truly human, revealing in nature and enjoying the meaningful company of other human beings.  Because these chapters are written in the frame-within-a-frame pattern earlier exhibited in the letters of Walton, the reader is able to perceive that the creature is really the better being than his creator, as Mr. Bloom observes.  For, both Walton and Victor Frankenstein are headed on collison courses with destriction because their paths are in defiance of nature as Victor dabbles too far in science, extending human knowledge further than it was meant to go and Walton seeks to enter realms not meant for man.

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