My Last Duchess Questions and Answers
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What is a metaphor and where can I find one in "My Last Duchess"?

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William Delaney eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Here is another example of a metaphor in some lines from "My Last Duchess":

Who'd stoop to blame
This sort of trifling? Even had you skill
In speech--(which I have not)--to make your will
Quite clear to such an one, and say, "Just this
Or that in you disgusts me; here you miss,
Or there exceed the mark"--and if she let
Herself be lessoned so, nor plainly set
Her wits to yours, forsooth, and made excuse,
--E'en then would be some stooping; and I choose
Never to stoop.

The Duke does not mean the words "stoop" and "stooping" literally but metaphorically. If he did try to reprimand his young wife his posture would undoubtedly remain rigid and erect, but he would consider it a kind of crouching or bowing, humbling himself, to try complaining, explaining and requesting. So "stoop" and "stooping" are metaphors as used in the poem.

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amy-lepore eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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There she stands
As if alive. Will't please you rise? We'll meet
The company below, then. I repeat,
The Count your master's known munificence
Is ample warrant that no just pretence
Of...




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