Course in General Linguistics by Ferdinand de Saussure

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Please, I am asked to write an essay about the applications of "Course in General Linguistics." I would love to have some information ...to have a simple but good essay. Thanks.  The applications of...

Please, I am asked to write an essay about the applications of "Course in General Linguistics." I would love to have some information ...to have a simple but good essay. Thanks. 

The applications of general linguitics. 

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In "Course in General Linguistics," Saussure described the way language represents ideas and objects. The "sound image" (or written word) is the signifier and the idea or object that the "sound image" represents is the signified. The combination of signifier "tree" and the signified thing or idea of a tree is called the "sign." Saussure also noted that the relationship between the signifier and signified, while necessary to convey meaning, is inherently arbitrary. In other words, there is no essential connection to the letters T-R-E-E and the tree itself. This is easily proved by the existence of other languages. 

If the word (or sound of the word) does not have meaning in and of itself and its relation to the actual thing or idea, how does it have meaning? "Tree" means tree because of its relation (difference/similarity) to other signs. Therefore, "tree" means tree because we contextualize it. We, as a community agree that "tree" means tree and "forest" means forest and "is" means exists or dwells in a certain place. Saussure states: 

The arbitrary nature of the sign explains in turn why the social fact alone can create a linguistic system. The community is necessary if values that owe their existence solely to usage and general acceptance are to be set up; by himself the individual is incapable of fixing a single value. 

Without these particular connections between signifiers and signifieds and their overall connection to each other, "The tree is in the forest" would mean nothing. Therefore, meaning is constructed via this relationship among signs and their associations between signifiers and signifieds. 

Saussure also distinguished between the abstract system (and rules) of language and the individual speech acts which enact language. The abstract rules he called...

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