please help The art of Argument class: I have been asked by my Professor this question ARGUE WHY YOU SHOULD RECEIVE AN “A” IN THE ART OF THE ARGUMENT. What is your most persuasive argument for...

please help The art of Argument class:

I have been asked by my Professor this question ARGUE WHY YOU SHOULD RECEIVE AN “A” IN THE ART OF THE ARGUMENT. What is your most persuasive argument for an “A” and what is the weakest? Should student self-assessment be factored into the grade? (Write at least one paragraph 5-6 sentences).

 

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psyproffie | College Teacher | (Level 3) Assistant Educator

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This question requires a persuasive essay, a persuasive essay uses logic and the writer’s purpose is to show that their opinion or stance on a topic is more legitimate than the other answer and convince the reader of this. In this question there are two stances, one that you deserve an “A” in the class and one that you do not deserve an “A” in the class.

In order to write a persuasive essay you must first state your stance within the introduction to your essay, which is that you deserve an “A” in this class. You want a thesis statement, or a statement that provides an outline for what evidence you will present to support your stance. 

Within the body of the essay you want to present clear and measurable information as to why you deserve an “A”. Some ideas are that you could include application of the class reading in weekly assignments, showing examples of how you have a working knowledge of the key concepts that are the learning objectives within the class as outlined within the syllabus, or showing how you have applied feedback to improve your work.

Finally you want to disprove the alternative answer, that you do not deserve an “A” but showing mistakes in the logic. You can find this information in areas such as course objectives or grading rubrics presented within the class by showing how you have met these objectives and met the guidelines of the rubrics.

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