Personification In Romeo And Juliet

Please give me three examples of personification in Romeo and Juliet (including the act and scene number).

Quick Answer

Personification is often used to animate symbols or motifs in the text. The motif of death is personified by Juliet when she says, “Death, not Romeo, take my maidenhead” (3.2). The concept of beauty is personified by Lady Capulet when she urges Juliet to “find delight writ there with beauty's pen” (1.4). Love itself, a central theme of the play, is personified as “so gentle in his view” but “so tyrannous and rough in proof” (1.1).


Expert Answers info

jdslinky eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2010

write73 answers

starTop subjects are Literature and Social Sciences

Personification is the humanizing of an inanimate object. In other words, it is the act of giving human traits to non-human things. Shakespeare was a master of this type of figurative language, and as such, his plays are absolutely riddled with personification.

It's difficult to choose just 3 examples of personification from "Romeo and Juliet;" however, there are a few extraordinary uses of it.

During the fight scene in the opening act, Prince Escalus admonishes the families for their constant fighting in the streets:

Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word

By thee, Old Capulet, and Montague,

Have...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 692 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


check Approved by eNotes Editorial

mwestwood eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2006

write16,149 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

Further Reading:

check Approved by eNotes Editorial

missy575 eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2010

write2,291 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, Social Sciences, and History