Please provide an analysis of "Teenage Sky" by Rona Adshead.

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This poem uses an extended metaphor (a metaphor is a comparison that does not the words like or as) to liken the morning sky to a teenager. Just like a teenager, the morning sky is moody and changes from moment to moment or, as the poem puts it, is "made...

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This poem uses an extended metaphor (a metaphor is a comparison that does not the words like or as) to liken the morning sky to a teenager. Just like a teenager, the morning sky is moody and changes from moment to moment or, as the poem puts it, is "made of /mood and moment."

The morning sky, like a teenager, also exists in a liminal moment. To be liminal is to be in a state of transition. The morning sky is transitioning from night to day, while a teenager is transitioning from childhood to adulthood.

Both the morning sky and a teenager can look "awkward" as they make the transition. We read of the moon becoming "anorexic" as it fades away under the strength of the sunlight, and the sky, like a teenager, wearing denim blue colors. The morning also, like a teenager, wraps itself in scarves. In the case of the morning, these scarves are the mists draped over the hills.

Morning is a time of anticipation and hope; so is adolescence.

Just as the morning sky will solidify into day, so, we readers are reassured, the teenager will solidify into the mature adult and "glow," like the day, with "fulfillment."

By comparing being a teen to the morning sky, the poem encourages us to think in new ways about adolescence.

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Rona Adshead's "Teenage Sky" is a poem that divides into four stanzas of five lines each. The lines are unrhymed and each line has between seven and ten syllables. 

As the poem's title implies, the superficial theme of the poem is that the weather is fickle and moody like a teenage woman.

Throughout the poem, the author applies terms to the sky that are often associated with the stereotypical teenage female: "hesitant horizon"; "lipstick...sunrise"; "nubile hills" (evokes the image of a young woman's breasts); "unsure"; the sky is dressed in "denim blue"; "anorexic crescent moon"; "sulky pout"; "weeping clouds". 

The final stanza ends on a hopeful note; namely that the "teenage" sky is just the beginning of life and that the day of life has many more hours to come. The noon of life, for example, will bring about changes that will cause the woman/sky to "glow in your fulfillment".

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