Please explain the repetition used and its effect in "The Raven." 

In "The Raven," repetition is used to create a sense of unease and dread, as well as to chart the speaker's arc from the fragile hope of seeing his beloved again in the afterlife to total despair.

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Repetition in "The Raven" is used to create a sense of dread more than anything, though it also gives the reader a glimpse into the psychology of the poem's speaker, who is a grief-stricken man obsessed both with the woman he has lost and the question of life after death.

Initially, the most obvious repetition in the poem is the speaker wondering about the cause of the rapping at his chamber door:

While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
“'Tis some visitor,” I muttered, “tapping at my chamber door—Only this and nothing more.”

Here, the speaker is trying to reassure himself that everything is okay. He is not convinced that this is true, and usually repeating a mantra or thought can have a calming effect. The speaker repeats this general line of thought throughout much of the first section of the poem before the raven itself starts chipping away at his fragile sense of security.

Another instance of...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 1048 words.)

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