Please explain the following lines from the poem ''On a Drop of Dew'' by Andrew Marvell?"Round in itself incloses And in its little globe's extent Frames as it can its native element" Please...

Please explain the following lines from the poem ''On a Drop of Dew'' by Andrew Marvell?

"Round in itself incloses

And in its little globe's extent

Frames as it can its native element"

Please explain each line in a simple way.

Asked on by rozh

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tinicraw | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Here, Marvell is examining one of the smallest objects in our world--the dew drop. One question he might have been answering in this poem is, "How is the universe contained in a small object?"  Marvell first describes the physical shape of the dew drop with "round." The earth, moon, and sun are all round just like the dew drop. The next part says that this droplet encloses around itself to keep its shape. He mentions the shape again in the next line by calling it a little globe; but as a globe, he can references the shapes of the universe. Even though this globe of water is tiny, it meets its creator's potential to the "extent" that it can. Then, just like a picture frames its contents, so does the droplet frame "its native element" or, the vital content that makes it what it is--a little round droplet of H2O. Within the most simple objects that we can see everyday, Marvell creatively points out its similarities to shapes seen in the universe.

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