Where is there evidence of Feminism in The Scarlet Letter?

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As the other answer states, feminism as we understand it today was not a part of Hawthorne's worldview in this novel—set in the seventeenth-century Puritan world—but strong glimmers of feminism nevertheless shine through.

First, Hester Prynne, a woman, is by far the strongest of the main characters of the...

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As the other answer states, feminism as we understand it today was not a part of Hawthorne's worldview in this novel—set in the seventeenth-century Puritan world—but strong glimmers of feminism nevertheless shine through.

First, Hester Prynne, a woman, is by far the strongest of the main characters of the novel. She faces up to her "crime" of adultery. She does not run away from Salem to start life in a new place, as she could have done. She bears her shame openly and bravely. Ultimately she redeems her scarlet letter through her modest life and good works, turning it into a badge of honor by her strength of character and helpfulness to others. Yet she also questions the plight of women as a feminist might, asking:

Indeed, the same dark question often rose into her mind, with reference to the whole race of womanhood. Was existence worth accepting, even to the happiest among them?

She is strong enough not to expose Dimmesdale, though he wishes she would do so, understanding that it is his burden. She has enough sense of self not to let him off the hook—she knows he needs to take responsibility for his own confession. He is too weak, however, through most of the novel to do what she did and bear the consequences of adultery. Instead, Dimmesdale is sickened and tortured by his weakness in being afraid to come forward, not confessing his part in the adultery until he is ready to die.

Chillingworth, too, is a weaker character than Hester, skulking around, relying on subterfuge, and afraid of the shame of admitting he is her husband.

Hester lives the modest and exemplary life of a good woman of her period, but she thinks for herself and forges her own path. She also ends the novel vowing to fight for justice and hoping for a time when men and women can be treated equally.

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As an ideaology that supports equal political, economic, and social rights for women, Feminism was certainly not in existence in the setting of Hawthorne's narrative, nor was it supported in 1850 when The Scarlet Letter was published. Nevertheless, Hawthorne's conception of progression for women's place in society is certainly evident in the thinking of his main character, Hester Prynne, who evinces cultural feminism, which

attempts to heighten respect for what is traditionally considered women's work while focusing on building women's culture.

No submissive woman like those of the Puritan community, Hester has followed her sexual desires despite the stringent Puritan standards and freely taken the consequences for her actions. Despite the condemnation and censure of the community, Hester's independence prevails as she sews an elaborate A upon her dress, and as she refuses to allow herself to be totally marginalized by society.  Instead, she sews ornate gloves and other items for the leaders of the community; then, with her heart so sympathetic to misery, she tends the sick and dying. As a result, her tenderness and sympathy win her the admiration of many who come to view her letter as symbolizing "Able" or "Angel."

Certainly, there have been changes in Hester's appearance as she has lost much of her beauty, but they come because her feeling has changed to thought, and Hester comes to resemble independent women of the future. In Chapter XIII, Hawthorne writes,

Standing alone in the world,--alone, as to any dependence on society, ...she cast away the fragments of a broken chain. The world's law was no law for her mind....She assumed a freedom of speculation....In her lonesome cottage...thoughts visited her such as dared to enter no other dwelling....

Certainly, in her "lonesome cottage," Hester ponders the feminine question in her society, concluding that 

[A]s a first step, the whole system of society is to be torn down and built up anew.  Then, the very nature of the opposite sex, or its long hereditary habit, ...is to be essentially modified, before woman can be allowed to assume what seems a fair and suitable position. Finally, ...woman cannot take advantage of these ...reforms until she herself shall have undergone a still mightier change.

These are, indeed, progressive feminist thoughts for a woman of  mid-seventeenth-century New England. Confronted by her restrictive society, Hester despairs at times as there is no comfort for her. "The scarlet letter had not done its office" on one of such independence as Hester Prynne.

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