Please explain and analyze this quotation from Dr Faustus?Faustus: Ay, and body too, but what of that? Think'st thou that Faustus is so fond to imagine, That after this life there is any pain? No,...

Please explain and analyze this quotation from Dr Faustus?

Faustus:

Ay, and body too, but what of that?

Think'st thou that Faustus is so fond to imagine,

That after this life there is any pain?

No, these are trifles,  and mere old wives' tales.

Asked on by rozh

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stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Doctor Faustus is talking to Mephistopheles just after he used his own blood to sign away his soul to Lucifer, the devil and Mephistopheles's master.

Faustus, having now given his body and soul to be transported to the habitation of the devil at the end of the twenty-four years covered by the pledge, is curious about the location and conditions in hell. As Mephistopheles is now required to provide answers to any questions Faustus wishes to ask, he begins by asking about his future.

Faustus: First will I question thee about hell. Tell me where is the place that men call hell? Meph: Under the heavens. Faustus: Aye, but whereabout? Meph: Within the bowels of these elements...All places shall be hell that is not Heaven.

Faustus doesn't believe what Mephistopheles says, proclaiming hell to be "a fable." Mephistopheles predicts Faustus will change his mind when he begins to experience hell, and assures Faustus that he will do so since he has completed signing "the scroll wherein thou hast given thy soul to Lucifer."

Faustus responds with the passage you quote - an indication of how little concern he has about his future. He agrees that he has given soul and body to the devil and discounts the idea that there is pain after death, calling such ideas "trifles and mere old wives' tales."

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