Please discuss the themes you see developing in Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm's “Little Red Cap” and Charles Perrault “Little Red Riding Hood.” Connect these two stories.

The two stories are connected in that they both aim to illustrate the same moral, that it is very dangerous to listen to strangers. However, they differ in their endings. In the Grimm version of the story, the big bad wolf drowns at the end. In the Perrault version, on the other hand, the wolf eats both Little Red Riding Hood and her grandmother.

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There are a number of themes common to the versions of the Little Red Riding Hood story written by Charles Perrault and the Brothers Grimm.

For one, there is the theme of what we would now call stranger-danger. In the Grimms' “Little Red Cap,” the title character makes the mistake...

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There are a number of themes common to the versions of the Little Red Riding Hood story written by Charles Perrault and the Brothers Grimm.

For one, there is the theme of what we would now call stranger-danger. In the Grimms' “Little Red Cap,” the title character makes the mistake of stopping to talk to a wolf as she makes her way to her grandmother's house. In the ensuing conversation, she foolishly reveals the whereabouts of her grandmother's cottage, giving the wolf an idea as to where he might get his next meal.

In Perrault's “Little Red Riding Hood,” the girl does the same thing. And as with the Grimm Brothers' version, she is distracted by the joys of nature, which allows the wolf to gain a head start on reaching the grandmother's cottage.

A further theme common to both stories is that not all adults are entirely trustworthy. Although the big bad wolf is an animal, he represents those adults who set out to harm children. This is related to the theme of stranger danger that we examined earlier.

In Perrault's version of the story, the wolf shows himself to be untrustworthy by gobbling up both Little Red Riding Hood and her grandmother. The same thing happens in the Brothers Grimm version, although a passing huntsman is able to save Little Red Riding Cap and her grandmother by cutting open the wolf's belly with a pair of scissors.

In an alternative ending, Little Red Riding Cap and her grandmother tempt the wolf into the cottage with the smell of sausages. Attracted by the delicious smell, the wolf falls off the roof and into a trough filled with water, where he subsequently drowns.

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