Please compare Hamlet's soliloquy at the end of act 4, scene 4 with act 2, scene 2.

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The tone of Hamlet's soliloquy at the end of act 2, scene 2 is frantic. He is desperate to uncover the truth about Claudius: "If he but blench, / I know my course." He is distraught that a mere actor can bring tears to his eyes over the imagined actions of Hecuba, and Hamlet sees himself by comparison as dull and hesitant, seeming to be an actor in someone else's life.

Hamlet is pretty self-loathing in this speech, referring to himself as a villian, a slave, hesitant, a coward, an an ass. He feels simultaneously compelled to act on behalf of his father's murder and unsure if he has the courage to do what is needed to uncover the truth and then act on it. By the end of this soliloquy, he bolsters up his resolve for action: "I'll have grounds / More relative than this. The play's the thing / Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the king."

In act 4, scene 4, Hamlet has emerged as a more steady voice. Here, he feels confident that "all occasions do inform against [him] / And spur [his] dull revenge."...

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