Please analyze the meaning and effect of the language (including poetic devices), form, structure, and context of "Postcard from a Travel Snob" by Sophie Hannah.

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The irony in this particular poem certainly produces a comic effect for the reader and allows us to understand that we are not supposed to identify with the "snob[bish]" speaker. In calling the speaker a snob in the title, the author immediately begins to show us that we are not...

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The irony in this particular poem certainly produces a comic effect for the reader and allows us to understand that we are not supposed to identify with the "snob[bish]" speaker. In calling the speaker a snob in the title, the author immediately begins to show us that we are not supposed to like or agree with the speaker.

Rather than the usual "Wish You Were Here" sentiment expressed by one's typical postcard, this poem starts with the speaker's claim, "I do not wish that anyone were here." When she considers what she thinks of as a typical vacation, she imagines karaoke and beer for drunk tourists, followed by the verbal equivalent of a shudder, "perish the thought." We can just imagine her clutching her pearls! These activities may not be everyone's cup of tea, but to each their own, right? She can have her "anthropological" holiday in a "local farmer's van" avoiding "sangria" at all costs, but why begrudge others their own version of a holiday?

When the speaker refers to these other "tourist types" as "philistine[s]" and herself as "multi-cultural," her depiction as a snob seems complete. Dramatic irony is created when the reader understands more than a character; the character, in this case, is the speaker of the poem, herself.

The word choices I've identified help the reader to understand that we are not supposed to endorse the speaker's way of thinking and that we should not align ourselves with the titular snob. These word choices, her diction, create the dramatic irony that both creates some humor as well as tells us how to read the poem: not as a serious endorsement of someone's views on travel but, rather, a portrayal of someone whose desire for authentic travel experiences has, ironically, reduced her humanity.

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