Please analyze the quote below from A Doll's House. What is the significance/importance of this quote? [No, no; only lean on me; I will advise you and direct you.  I should not be a man if...

Please analyze the quote below from A Doll's House.

What is the significance/importance of this quote?

[No, no; only lean on me; I will advise you and direct you.  I should not be a man if this womanly helplessness did not just give you a double attractiveness in my eyes.  You must not think any more about the hard things I said in my first moment of consternation, when I thought everything was going to overwhelm me.  I have forgiven you, Nora; I swear to you I have forgiven you.]

 

Asked on by hopemante

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lsumner | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

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Torvald is speaking in the quote above. He says this moments after he has yelled at Nora and told her to go to her room. When he thought his reputation was on the line, he was extremely upset with Nora. Moments later, he receives the IOU note and burns it. He is so relieved. He now exclaims that he has forgiven Nora for what she did. He has forgiven Nora for borrowing money behind his back in order to save his life with a trip to a much warmer climate, Italy.

When he thought his reputation had been ruined, he yelled and scolded Nora as if she were his child. Now, he wants to pretend nothing has happened. Torvald claims that Nora's "womanly helplessness" is what makes her so attractive in his eyes.

Torvald is a male chauvinist. He treats Nora as a helpless child. He does not even consider what she has sacrificed for him. Nora has done without clothes trying to repay the loan that she borrowed for Torvald's health issues. In return, he criticizes her as if she were a helpless child. That is what makes her attractive in his eyes. He does not respect her intellect. He has no idea what great business sense she has. He cares only about himself. That is why Nora cannot love him any longer. That is why she must leave.

 

 

 

 

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