In the play there are several couples, what types of love are seen in each of the relationships? Please explain with examples from the book Tell me the types of love for Theseus and Hippolyta,...

In the play there are several couples, what types of love are seen in each of the relationships? Please explain with examples from the book

Tell me the types of love for Theseus and Hippolyta, Hermia and Lysander, Helena and Demetrius, Titiania and Bottom, and Titania and Oberon, please.

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luannw eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Hippolyta and Theseus have a one-sided relationship. At the beginning of Act 1, sc. 1, the dialogue between the two of them shows that Theseus is the one who is excited about their marriage; Hippolyta is not. Since Theseus conquered Hippolyta and took her as his prize, that's not surprising.

Hermia and Lysander have a lustful relationship, at least from Lysander's side. In Act 2, sc. 2, then the two of them are tired and decide to sleep in the woods, Lysander wants to sleep with Hermia, but she tells him, essentially, that she's not that kind of girl and to save it for their marriage.

Helena seems to really love Demetrius, but he is fickle because they once had a relationship and he ended it (Act 1, sc. 1). When he receives the nectar from the magic flower, he loves Helena again.

Titania and Bottom don't really have a love relationship. Titania is under the influence of the magic flower and Bottom doesn't seem to realize that Titania loves him (Act 3, sc. 1). Titania and Oberon have the firmest relationship. Theirs goes back a long way and their argument at the beginning of the play deals largely with the issue of jealousy. Oberon is jealous of the boy that Titania is paying attention to and Titania thinks that Oberon is there because he has a thing for Hippolyta (Act 2, sc. 1). Once the spell has been removed form Titania (Act 4, sc.1), however, she relents and the two of them go off happily (Act 5).

Read the study guide:
A Midsummer Night's Dream

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