In the play, The Crucible, what does Abigail say to John Proctor to convince him to be with her?

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In act 1, John Proctor visits Reverend Parris's home and ends up having an intimate conversation alone with Abigail Williams, who tempts him to be with her. Abigail tempts John by reminding him of their passionate affair and comments that she can sense his desire (heat) at night. She mentions that she has looked into his window many nights and witnessed him "burning" in his loneliness. She is aware that John is lonely man and hopes to persuade him into continuing their affair. Abigail then breaks into tears and admits that she continues to dream about John every night and illustrates her affection for him by attempting to give him a hug. Each time John pushes her away and halts her advances, Abigail reminds him of their passionate affair and insists that he still has feelings for her. Despite Abigail's numerous advances, John Proctor is resolute and refuses to give in to his lust, which upsets Abigail, who begins to criticize his ill wife, Elizabeth.

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Abigail Williams tries to convince John Proctor to be with her by emphasizing the fact that it was his wife, Elizabeth, who fired her seven months ago, not him.  She reminds him of the sexual heat and passion between them before Elizabeth released Abigail from their service.  She says, "I saw your face when she put me out, and you loved me then and you do now!"  She believes that John still loves her, and he does not deny it; he only says that he will never "reach" for her again.  Moreover, Abigail says that she has looked out her window at night and seen John looking up at it, "burning in [his] loneliness."  She knows that he is lonely and that he still, to some extent, desires and even cares for her, and she tries to get him to give in to those feelings.  Abigail also insults Elizabeth, calling her "sickly" and accusing her of trying to harm Abigail's reputation in town.  Of course, none of this works, and John rebuffs Abigail and returns to his wife.

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