Lord of the Flies by William Golding

Lord of the Flies book cover
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In Lord of the Flies, Piggy is clearly clever boy, but he is a victim too. How is he important in the novel?

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troutmiller eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Although he is considered an outcast by the boys, Piggy represents the knowledge in this book.  He is the common sense behind all of Ralph 's decisions.  Piggy is the character who has the most important item on the island--his glasses.  They represent the fire/signal.  Without them, they would not have been rescued.  In fact, Piggy represents "vision" in this book because only he can truly see what's happening to the boys.  He is the representation of what the adult world thinks.  Because he is so different (mature), he is disliked.  No one wants to hang around someone who always talks of...

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luannw eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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sarahloasby | Student

Piggy is a victim because he is clearly someone who is often picked on, early on in the book we realise that he was bullied at school. He is also a victim of jack who is constantly mean to piggy, he always calls piggy fatty and tries to take piggys voice away from him (this is by trying to get rid of the conch). Finally piggy is murdered and dies with the conch due to jack and his tribe.