physics why can't we see objects of dimension greater than 3 ?

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litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I do not think most of us need to concern ourselves with other dimensions. We exist in three dimensions, we see in three dimensions, and we think in three dimensions. Other than for theoretical postulation, what benefit is there to other dimensions? Of course, there's always time travel.
trophyhunter1's profile pic

trophyhunter1 | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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There is a wonderful animation about all 10 dimensions on youtube that my son showed me yesterday. I have to say that I actually understood each dimension, because the video was that good. Check it out.

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lrwilliams | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

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In response to ask996's question, I would like to think that as humans we would indeed evolve and be able to adapt to the other dimensions if it became necessary. Past history shows that the human body has been able to adapt to other changes in our environment.

trophyhunter1's profile pic

trophyhunter1 | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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The way we perceive our surroundings has to do with the adaptations we have inherited during our evolution over a long period of time. Human senses perceive the world in a way that differs from other organisms. We can see in the visible spectrum of light, however, other organisms like snakes can perceive infrared. Some organisms like dogs can hear sounds above the human ability to sense.  However, since we exist in three dimensions, it seems like that is all we can actually perceive. But, isn't it wonderful that the human brain can picture, think about and hypothesize about things beyond our ability to see?

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ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

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Pohnpei, I appreciate the credible link you provided for further research. Bikemanne-a, I appreciate the scientific(?) explanation provided, I understand most of it. Brettd, I appreciate the new term that you provided which enables further research.

What about this question: If other dimensions do exist, and it becam necessary for human survival that these dimensions could be seen, would the human eye and brain adapt to view them?

brettd's profile pic

brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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It has been suggested that there are ten dimensions, and that human beings can exist only in three, that their vibrational levels put them on different dimensional planes than other forms of existence.  Now, I don't know if any of that is true, but String Theory is interesting to say the least.

Another way to look at it is, how could humans see beyond the third dimension when every organ for sensory input exists within those three?

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

You could argue that this is because there are not really more than 3 dimensions.  After all, it has not been conclusively proven that other dimensions even exist.

I do not believe that anyone argues that the other dimensions, if they exist, would even be visible to human beings.

Here's a link that discusses the issue:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/elegant/dimensions.html

bickemanne-a's profile pic

bickemanne-a | High School Teacher | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted on

It is not possible for a human being to see anything beyond the 3rd dimension let alone even reach the true 3rd dimension itself.

At the lowest level, our eyes provide two 2D FLAT surfaces. These images are then processed into a single 2D CURVED surface embedded in 3-space with the following constraint: every ray starting at the origin intersects the surface once and only once. This is called 2+1D.

 

The fact is, we do NOT think in 3D. If human beings were capable of visualizing in 3D then we would be able to visualize the backside of an object at the same time as the front side, at the same time as every other side, at the same time as the INside. At the lowest level, our eyes provide two 2D FLAT surfaces. These images are then processed into a single 2D CURVED surface embedded in 3-space with the following constraint: every ray starting at the origin intersects the surface once and only once. This is called 2+1D.

 

The fact is, we do NOT think in 3D. If human beings were capable of visualizing in 3D then we would be able to visualize the backside of an object at the same time as the front side, at the same time as every other side, at the same time as the Inside.

Why can we not see in the 4th dimensions of Physics and Space? Well, we must ask ourselves, why can we not truly see the 3rd dimension to begin with?

 

 

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