The Philosophy of Human life in Sylvia Plath's poetryI want to know some thing about Plath's poetry: If you can mention the philosophy of human life in Sylvia Plath's poetry then plz post here in...

The Philosophy of Human life in Sylvia Plath's poetry

I want to know some thing about Plath's poetry:

If you can mention the philosophy of human life in Sylvia Plath's poetry then plz post here in detail. and I am very thankful to you if you send me in message too.thanks abundant

regards"

Ahmad

3 Answers | Add Yours

literaturenerd's profile pic

literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Plath was a Confessionalist poet. Therefore, her work was one which spoke to how her life was and the conflicts she faced. Her work is typically seen as dark and depressing. Her philosophy was simply not to feel as if one had to hide anything.

accessteacher's profile pic

accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Plath's poetry covers a number of different topics, and it is really important to realise that not all of her works fit one approach to life. However, we could argue that there are some definite themes and approaches towards life that come through. These are rather pessimistic, as #3 points out. They normally feature the pain and suffering of personas who are generally female as they struggle to exist in a world with various barriers and restrictions on them. Consider "Miss Drake Proceeds to Supper" for example, which explores one woman struggling with insanity as she carries out a normal action.

vangoghfan's profile pic

vangoghfan | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

It's very difficult to generalize about such things, but from the reading of Plath that I have done, I would say that her philosophy of life is rather grim and pessimistic, at least in some of her more famous works, such as "Daddy" (http://www.internal.org/Sylvia_Plath/Daddy). The fact that Plath committed suicide would also suggest that fundamentally her view of life was not exactly optimistic or cheerful.

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