Philosophy: How does philosophy courses help social problems?How does philosophy courses help social problems?

5 Answers | Add Yours

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Students in universities may take many different kinds of courses, but all students should have a foundation in philosophy. Philosophy underpins our culture and humanity. It gives us an opportunity to investigate our common Sigurd and differencens. All students should explore Plato and Socrates and beyond.
rrteacher's profile pic

rrteacher | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I'm unsure of what the question is asking. Are you asking how philosophy helps cause social problems, or how it helps solve them? I do think that some aspects of political philosophy, particularly political economy, can exacerbate, if not cause, social problems. We can see this in a state's rigid adherence to one particular approach to an economic situation (the British government's response to the famine in Ireland, for example.) But I don't think this is exactly the kind of philosophy you're talking about.

e-martin's profile pic

e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Could you offer an example of a complex problem created by philosophy? 

I will grant that phiosophy, as a discipline, tends to complicate issues before simplifying them, if the issues ever get simplified. However, I have a hard time coming up with examples of social problems created by society... 

e-martin's profile pic

e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

One way to answer this question: Philosophy courses can help us to recognize that there are numerous ways in which to approach a given problem. Many schools of philosophy have dealt with the same issues (free will; morality; epistemology, etc.) and have approached the topics quite differently, coming to quite different conclusions as well. 

When we see that many "correct" answers are available to the same problem, we begin, hopefully, to recognize how important the role of choice is to our emphasis on one answer, or to our demands in insisting that our view is the right one. We see that, because multiple valid points of view can exist, our decision to insist on only one view is a decision, a choice, and not a defense of a necessary (or necessarily correct) position. 

One way to answer this question: Philosophy courses can help us to recognize that there are numerous ways in which to approach a given problem. Many schools of philosophy have dealt with the same issues (free will; morality; epistemology, etc.) and have approached the topics quite differently, coming to quite different conclusions as well. 

When we see that many "correct" answers are available to the same problem, we begin, hopefully, to recognize how important the role of choice is to our emphasis on one answer, or to our demands in insisting that our view is the right one. We see that, because multiple valid points of view can exist, our decision to insist on only one view is a decision, a choice, and not a defense of a necessary (or necessarily correct) position. 

Thank you for your answer. But still one thing that buffled me is that until now philosophy did not solve problems of the society instead philosophy created complicated complex problems.

We’ve answered 318,991 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question