pharaphrase, othello act 5, scene 2, lines 261 to 282paraphrase it behold, i have a weapon; a better never did itself sustain upon a solider's thigh. i have seen the day that with this little arm...

pharaphrase, othello act 5, scene 2, lines 261 to 282

paraphrase it

behold, i have a weapon; a better never did itself sustain

upon a solider's thigh. i have seen the day that with this little arm and this good sword

i have made my way through more impediments than twenty times your stop. but o vain boast! who can control his fate? tis not so now. be not afraid, through you do see me weaponed.

here is my jurney's end, here is my butt and very seamark of my utmost sail: do you go back dismayed? tis a lost fear. man but a rush against othell's breast and he retires. where should othello go?

now,how dost thou look now? o ill-starred wench! pale as thy smock! when we shall meet at compt, this look of thine will hurl my soul from heaven, and fiends will snatch at it.

cold, cold, my girl? even like thy chastity. o cursed, cursed slave! whip me, ye devils, from the possession of this heavenly sight! blow me about in winds! roast me in sulphur! wash me in steep-down gulfs of liquid fire! oh desdemon! dead desdemon! dead! oh !oh!

Expert Answers
susan3smith eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Othello says this speech to Gratiano--at least initially--after Emilia has told him the truth about the handkerchief and Iago has killed her in retaliation.  Othello is being held prisoner in the bedroom while the others are hunting for Iago.  Gratiano is standing guard outside the door.

Just before this speech, Othello has asked Gratiano to step inside the room.  He confesses to Gratiano, who thought Othello was disarmed, that he has a weapon that any soldier might use to commit suicide.  And with this sword he has fought many men and could easily take Gratiano.  But he disdains boasting about his prowess and feels helpless in controlling his fate.  He declares that he is at the end of his journey and will do no harm to anyone else.  There is no need for Gratiano to be afraid; Othello claims he could be knocked over by something as flimsy as a reed.  If he should die, he knows he will go to hell.  If he should to heaven, one look from Desdemona would hurl his soul out of heaven into hell.

He turns to Desdemona and touches  her dead body and admits that she is cold and pure.  For his crime of murdering such an innocent, he feels that he cannot suffer too much.  He wants o be roasted, burned, or blown about.  No punishment is too great.